BTN: Social Media Negativity

Social Media Negativity BTN story 6/6/2017 

  1. What did a recent survey in the UK ask young people to rate?
  2. Which social media app came out with the most negative score?
  3. YouTube rated badly for impact on…
  4. What positive impact was YouTube found to have?
  5. Do you use social media? If so, which ones?
  6. What did you learn watching the BTN story?
  7. What was surprising about the BTN story?

 

Up for a challenge?

Try out this code breaking challenge for students aged 8-13 years old.

The ponds of wonder: Code Breaker 

Will I need anything to participate?

Some of the challenges will need you to use your mind, others your eyes and ears. It would be a good idea to have the following items with you as you play:

A notebook and pencil – to write down the codes as you solve them.

A printer (optional) – to print out some of the challenge sheets to work out, (sometimes it’s easier to work on a sheet of paper instead of staring at a screen).

Make sure that you have some headphones as some of the challenges will involve you having to listen to some music.

The original competition for prizes has closed but you can still enjoy solving the puzzles and can earn certificates for passing levels.

Have fun! 🙂 

War On Waste!

BTN: War on waste school 27/6/2017


1. What was the main point of the BTN story?
2. What was the mission that the kids in the BTN story set themselves?
3. What inspired them to go on this mission?
4. Australia is one of the biggest producers of trash in the world. True or false?
5. What reusable items did the students buy?
6. What is nude food?
7. What are the benefits of having nude food at school?
8. What does your school already do to reuse and recycle?
9. How well do you know the 5 Rs?
10. How has your thinking changed since watching the BTN story?

Fake News

BTN episode – Fake News: 29/11/2016

After watching the BTN episode post a quality comment answering the questions below.

  1. Give an example of a fake news story.
  2. Why are a lot of fake news stories created?
  3. Some are meant to deliberately trick people. Why?
  4. Why were experts worried about fake news stories during the US Presidential Election?
  5. What can readers do to be more aware of fake news stories?
  6. Why is it important to question everything you read online?
  7. What did you learn watching this story?

Reconciliation Week

Each year National Reconciliation Week (NRW) celebrates and builds on the respectful relationships shared by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians. It is a time for all Australians to learn about our shared histories, cultures and achievements, and to explore how each of us can join the national reconciliation journey.

NRW is held from 27 May to 3 June each year. Preceded by National Sorry Day on 26 May, NRW is bookended by two key events in Australia’s history, which provide strong symbols for reconciliation:

  •  27 May 1967 – the referendum that saw more than 90 per cent of Australians vote to give the Australian Government power to make laws for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and recognise them in the census.
  •  3 June 1992 – the Australian High Court delivered the Mabo decision, which recognised that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a special relationship with the land. This paved the way for land rights or Native Title.

Reconciliation Week: 26/5/15 BTN story

This Years Theme

N.R.W has a different theme each year – the 2017 theme is ‘Let’s take the next steps’. As we reflect and commemorate two significant anniversaries of reconciliation in Australia, we look to take the next steps together in our national reconciliation story.

The theme ‘Let’s take the next steps’ reflects the nature of our Nation’s reconciliation journey so far, and looks forward, taking the next steps in this continuous journey. Earmarked by the two key anniversaries of the 1967 referendum and the 1992 Mabo Decision. In reflecting on and discussing taking the next steps it is important to acknowledge and discuss the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and reconciliation in Australia.

Answer the following questions and post as a comment below.

You will need to do some further research to answer some of the questions.

1. What does reconciliation mean?

2. Why do you think Reconciliation Australia chose this theme for National Reconciliation Week in 2017?
3. Does the poster effectively communicate a message about reconciliation? Why/why not?
4. What was the significance of the 1967 Referendum and what is the significance of its 50th anniversary in 2017?
5. What wast the significance of the 1992 Mabo decision, and what is the significance of its 25th anniversary in 2017?
6. What are some other significant milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey, and why is it important to commemorate these milestones?
7. What do you think some of the next milestones could or should be in Australia’s reconciliation journey and why? What might be your “next step” towards advancing reconciliation in Australia—as an individual, as a class, as a school and as a community?


Create your own National Reconciliation Week poster: Create your own poster based on the theme ‘Let’s take the next steps’. It is important to choose the right images, layout, size and quantity of text, colour and composition for effective communication and to grab your audiences attention. When creating your poster, consider what the purpose of the poster is, who the audience might be, and why certain images and text have been included in the poster.

Reading an information text

Today you will use the knowledge you have gained about Information Report text features and structure to help you read and answer questions in a text titled ‘Fashion Rules’.

(Source: http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/viewing/S5854/index.html)

Fashion rules!

Teenage boy wearing casual clothes Three female fashion models

Australian children think that fashion is important. And it’s not just the teenagers. Children as young as five now like wearing the latest styles. However, research shows that this is costing parents a lot of money.

In 2011, Australian parents spent an average of $550 on clothing for each child under the age of 12. This was an increase of 25% from 2010. Most of the increase has been caused by the purchase of trendy clothing, which is often more expensive. Sally Hayes is the manager of a large chain of Australian department stores. She says, ‘Children, especially girls, are no longer interested in wearing boring clothing. They like dressing in styles that are worn by pop stars and other celebrities. If they see something in a magazine or on the internet, they want to be able to buy it the next day. We supply what they want’. Recent favourites are short skirts, torn fabrics and high heels.

Boys are also keen to look the part. Boys prefer coloured jeans and t-shirts that are worn under open shirts. Adelaide mother Angela Jackson says, ‘My 10-year-old son is a keen skateboarder who wants to look like his skating heroes on television. As long as the clothing is comfortable, I am happy to buy it for him’.

Children’s health expert Dr Paul Telford worries about the amount of money that families are spending on their children’s clothes. ‘Many families are struggling to make ends meet,’ he says. ‘Parents tell me that they buy trendy clothes for their children because they want them to fit in with other kids. I think it would be better if children wore sensible clothes that did not cost too much. This would mean that families could spend their money on things that are more important, such as books and holidays together.’

Two of Australia’s biggest department stores predict that by 2016, families will be spending over a billion dollars every year on children’s clothing. The increase will be the result of more advertising on television and the internet that encourages kids to follow the latest fashions.

 

Read ‘Fashion rules’ then answer the questions in full sentences and with detailed answers.

  1. What does the text suggest about fashion?
  2. What does it say about boys? Girls?
  3. Angela Jackson says, ‘As long as the clothing is comfortable, I am happy to buy it for him.’ What does this suggests? Can you work out her attitude in what she says?
  4. Write 2 facts and 2 opinions from this text.
  5. Look for the reasons that Dr Telford gives for his opinion about kids’ fashions. What do you think are the words that best describe him?
  6. What is the importance of mathematics in this report?